CNBC’s Stephen Dubner on why he doesn’t feel comfortable with CNBC’s coverage of the election: ‘I don’t know if we’re the right place for me’

CNBC’s Stephen Dubner on why he doesn’t feel comfortable with CNBC’s coverage of the election: ‘I don’t know if we’re the right place for me’

CNBC host Stephen Dubs has been accused of using a racist slur in a tweet to a Black employee in 2016, and the network’s parent company has come under fire from a variety of sources for the way it handled the situation.

Dubner apologized to the employee in an email to CNBC’s employees on Monday, but did not acknowledge that the tweet had been written by Dubs, according to the Wall Street Journal.

In a statement to CNBC, CNBC said that Dubs had not used a racial slur in the tweet.

“We have zero tolerance for racism, bigotry and hate in any form and we deeply regret the hurt and pain this tweet has caused our colleagues,” CNBC CEO Steve Bannon said in the statement.

Dubs apologized to Black employees on his Twitter account.

In his apology, Dubs also denied that he used the slur in his tweet.

The company has since pulled the tweet, though the company did not say whether it would issue an apology for Dubs’ tweet.

On Monday, Dubner tweeted that CNBC’s “Black News” was “more than just black-centered.”

Dubs was referring to CNBC Black News, a daily program on CNBC that featured interviews with black entrepreneurs.

The program was created in 2014 by CNBC executives after a series of white-centric programming left some viewers angry.

CNBC has apologized for the program, which included interviews with former President Barack Obama, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders and Black Lives Matter activists.

Dubers’ tweet has prompted criticism from some critics who say it was disrespectful to African Americans, who Dubs is known for hosting on his show.

Dubz’ apology came just days after the network suspended two of his hosts, Stephen A. Smith and Ben Schreckinger, for their comments about Black Lives Matters activists, the network said in a statement on Monday.

“The statement released today by CNBC is an important step in our commitment to diversity and inclusion.

We do not condone the use of hate speech and we are taking action to address this issue,” CNBC said in its statement.

“Stephen and Ben have apologized for their tweets and have been suspended from the network.”

The company did offer an apology to the network on Twitter on Monday morning.

“Our apology is a first step in bringing clarity to a situation that has taken on an extraordinary level of emotional impact,” the statement said.

“CNBC is committed to improving our workplace culture and making changes to help employees feel more comfortable around each other, while also creating a more positive workplace environment.”

On Monday night, CNN reported that CNBC suspended Smith, and said he had been fired.

CNN reported on Monday that Smith had resigned from his job as a correspondent and anchor at CNN, but the network had no immediate comment on the allegations against Dubs.

CNN’s Jim Acosta reported on CNNMoney on Monday night that Smith was fired after his colleague made a sexist comment about Black people.

CNN has since removed the article.

The Journal said that CNBC also suspended Schrecking, and that he has been removed from his position as a contributor.

CNN did not immediately respond to CNBC Newsroom’s request for comment on Monday afternoon.

On his show, Dubbs said that he is “a black man in America” and has “never used a word that is degrading to a group of people.”

The CNN interview that prompted Dubs to write the tweet was broadcast on Dec. 17, 2016, on the channel’s flagship program, “CNN Newsroom.”

The segment featured Dubs discussing how he thought the presidential election was going to play out.

Dubbs has been a frequent guest on “CNN’s Newsroom” for more than two decades.

On Sunday, a reporter from a CNN news organization wrote a story about Dubs tweeting the racist slur, which Dubs denied.

“I think that the story that CNN published on the subject was a hoax,” Dubs told CNBC on Monday evening.

“CNN, I’m sure, is a great network.

That is not the kind of person that I am. “

If I was to be accused of that, that would be ridiculous.

That’s all I was trying to do, and I apologize to my African American colleagues who I may have offended.” “

My intention was to show how people in America were reacting to a particular issue, and what it’s like for black people.

That’s all I was trying to do, and I apologize to my African American colleagues who I may have offended.”

The network’s statement to CNN on Monday said that the company has “zero tolerance for discrimination, bigotry, and hate of any kind.”

admin

Related Posts

Which currency is right for your business?

Which currency is right for your business?

Email-based insurance scam targeting consumers: Lawsuit says it could cost $1.2B

Email-based insurance scam targeting consumers: Lawsuit says it could cost $1.2B

How to buy ecommerce: Tips from real-life sellers

How to buy ecommerce: Tips from real-life sellers

Nordstrom and eBay hit back at a boycott threat

Nordstrom and eBay hit back at a boycott threat